An Antarctica science station is picking up noise from space weather. People are turning it into music.

If you know how to listen, space can be a noisy place, filled with all manner of radio burps and squelches, created by everything from solar flares to aurora to neutron stars.

When they’re not listening to the heaves and groans of various ice sheets, the boffings working with the British Antarctic Survey spends a lot of time listening to the sound generated by space weather.

Why? Because we need advance warning of geomagnetic events that could result in dead satellites, power outages, and messed up Internet networks.

Most of these sounds are inaudible to humans, but not all of them. Let’s take a listen to some of this noise.

https://soundcloud.com/user-629727076/halley-chorus-hiss-whistlers-1

Is there any practical use for this kind of audio? Actually, yes.

Artists are finding ways to incorporate this material into everything from music to video games. Try this, for example.

Read more at Gizmodo.

Alan Cross

is an internationally known broadcaster, interviewer, writer, consultant, blogger and speaker. In his 30+ years in the music business, Alan has interviewed the biggest names in rock, from David Bowie and U2 to Pearl Jam and the Foo Fighters. He’s also known as a musicologist and documentarian through programs like The Ongoing History of New Music.

2 thoughts on “An Antarctica science station is picking up noise from space weather. People are turning it into music.

  • October 23, 2019 at 5:40 am
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    Thank yu for your interest for sharing this. I am the artist-engineer working with BAS and we are offering a glimpse of new multimedia work (part of Aurora Musicalis) with performance work at the Festival of Ideas in Cambridge this Friday. It was completed while I was in Australia working with Kim Cunio at the School of Music (ANU) during my time as artist-in-residence. Visuals are stunning images from Antartica and the ‘Sounds of Space ‘ collected at Halley. https://vimeo.com/353704938

    Reply
    • October 23, 2019 at 5:41 am
      Permalink

      typing errors x 2 corrected
      Thank you for your interest for sharing this. I am the artist-engineer working with BAS and we are offering a glimpse of new multimedia work (part of Aurora Musicalis) with performance work at the Festival of Ideas in Cambridge this Friday. It was completed while I was in Australia working with Kim Cunio at the School of Music (ANU) during my time as artist-in-residence. Visuals are stunning images from Antarctica and the ‘Sounds of Space‘ collected at Halley. https://vimeo.com/353704938

      Reply

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