Apple’s Podcast Problem is a Problem for ALL Podcasters

Podcasting is becoming a multi-million dollar business. It could be even bigger if Apple, the company that made modern podcasting possible, would get on board. This is from the New York Times.

Steven P. Jobs put his talent as a master salesman to the test when, in 2005, he introduced new Apple software for downloading digital audio shows. The format was so incipient that he struggled to describe it.

“It’s sort of like TiVo, for radio, for your iPod,” he said. “It’s not just the ‘Wayne’s World’ of radio, but real radio is jumping onto this.”

But he was clear about the potential. “It’s getting very, very exciting,” he said.

He was talking about podcasting — radio-style shows made for the Internet that have, in recent years, exploded in popularity. These days, many amateur podcasters are going professional. Major media organizations, searching for answers and bright spots in a fast-changing and confusing digital world, are releasing new shows every week. Advertisers are starting to follow them, and so are millions of dollars of venture capital.

It is, in other words, an industry now, one that Apple essentially gave life to and still dominates. Yet at this moment of triumph for podcasting, concerns are growing in the community about how much Apple actually cares.

Interviews with over two dozen podcasters and people inside Apple reveal a variety of complaints. The podcasters say that they are relegated to wooing a single Apple employee for the best promotion. That sharing on social media is cumbersome. And that for podcasters to make money, they need more information about their listeners, and Apple is in a unique position to provide it. The problems, they say, could even open up an opportunity for a competitor.

Keep reading. You’ll see how weird and wrong things are.

Alan Cross

is an internationally known broadcaster, interviewer, writer, consultant, blogger and speaker. In his 30+ years in the music business, Alan has interviewed the biggest names in rock, from David Bowie and U2 to Pearl Jam and the Foo Fighters. He’s also known as a musicologist and documentarian through programs like The Ongoing History of New Music.

Let us know what you think!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.