Alan Cross

is an internationally known broadcaster, interviewer, writer, consultant, blogger and speaker. In his 40+ years in the music business, Alan has interviewed the biggest names in rock, from David Bowie and U2 to Pearl Jam and the Foo Fighters. He’s also known as a musicologist and documentarian through programs like The Ongoing History of New Music.

7 thoughts on “A Beginner’s Guide to Turntables [INFOGRAPHIC]

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  • September 26, 2014 at 1:15 pm
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    I bought a fantastic-sounding 60s Dual model (1019), with a Shure cartridge. It sounds amazing, but I’m finding it a touch finicky.

    My big regret is that it’s idler-wheel drive. I didn’t know any better. Replacement belt: $8. Replacement idler wheel: $80.

    Hopefully I don’t need one soon. I had trouble with the pitch changing while playing, but I suspect that may have been caused by the record slipping.

    Reply
  • September 26, 2014 at 1:22 pm
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    Mark, sorry to say but pitch changing and needle skip are typically not related. Skipping is generally due to a vinyl problem, or a tone arm tracking issue. Pitch changing is typically due to the drive system (motor, idler, etc.) The worst case (and I hope it isn’t true) is you have a bad motor that needs to be replaced. That will typically be more expensive than the idler.

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    • September 27, 2014 at 12:11 pm
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      I wrote “slipping” not “skipping”, fortunately never had a skip. The reason I thought the pitch-shifting might have to do with vinyl slipping is I observed it happen once with my eyes when the needle first hit the record.

      I don’t seem to have had any trouble since ensuring the records are firmly down on the rubber matting. I also reseated the platter once, but I feel the drive-system is unlikely to have been the cause because of how heavy the platter is (7.5 lbs) and how much momentum is involved.

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  • September 27, 2014 at 12:18 pm
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    So, I got a message my first response timed out… I mis-read “slipping”…oops. Might be an easier fix: tracking set too heavy, or you might need a record clamp / weight to hold the record more firmly to the platter.

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    • September 27, 2014 at 8:00 pm
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      Yeah I lost a reply too.

      Anyway as I said, just making a point of pushing the vinyl down seems to have worked. I’ve noticed the holes in a lot of modern albums are … brutal. Some aren’t wide enough, some look completely gouged out.

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    • September 27, 2014 at 8:02 pm
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      Oh one thing that did happen though, the Dual 1019 platter has rubber matting bands around where 7″ and 12″ records touch.

      For 10″ records it’s just steel. I completely wrecked the original needle by putting on a 10″, and the automatic function missed the edge. I also didn’t notice for a minute because I’d gone to another room.

      Reply

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