Big News in Little Records

The biggest word in Record Store Day collectibles is tiny: the RSD Mini Turntable. 

This makes a lot of sense, considering all indications suggest that vinyl is becoming king again of the physical musical media mountain. Mini records — 3″ pieces of vinyl — take up less space than regular 78s, like CDs, but without giving up the depth and warmth of sound. 

There’s even an official RSD record player, developed and marketed in conjunction with Crosley and released earlier this year for Record Store Day in April. 

The availability of albums to play on it is kind of limited for now, with some releases from Third Man and Epitaph Records on the initial wave.

But now there’s a second wave coming, and it’s got some big names. 

RSD is working with the Sun Record Company to release a whole new series of classics on 3″singles, including Johnny Cash’s “Cry! Cry! Cry!,” Jerry Lee Lewis’ “Great Balls of Fire,” Carl Perkins’ “Honey, Don’t!” and Roy Orbison’s “Devil Doll.” 

Each song has been lovingly remastered and is packaged with a fold-out poster of the artist on the album.

But don’t worry, you won’t have to wait until Black Friday Record Store Day to snap up these beauties — they’ll be released on October 18!

Why then? 

It’s the golden anniversary of the legendary and influential label, created by Sam Phillips, being moved to Nashville by the Singleton brothers, Shelby and John, in 1969. 

“I am so proud to have been able to work on various projects with the Singletons and Sun Record Company over the last few years and even prouder still that we get to offer music fans these super cool tributes to four of the men who did in fact create rock ‘n’ roll along with Sam Phillips and his beloved Sun Records label,” said Michael Kurtz, RSD’s founder. “Anyone who has read Peter Guralnick’s book, Sam Phillips, The Man Who Invented Rock ‘N’ Roll knows about the famous address he gave to a group of record store owners and staff, myself included.” 

Already available on 3″ singles are the Beastie Boys’ “Sabotage,” Foo Fighters’ “Big Me” and a series of four singles from the Insane Clown Posse. Really.

Amber Healy

I write about music policy and lawsuits because they're endlessly fascinating.

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