BURN All This Cool Punk Stuff? This Makes Me Very, Very Sad.

This summer is being celebrated at the 40th anniversary of the punk rock explosion in the UK. However, Sex Pistols manager Malcolm McLaren–one of the scene’s prime instigators–wants none of it.

“Wait!” you’re probably thinking, “Didn’t Malcolm die several years ago? How can he–.”

“It’s his son, Joseph Corré, along with Malcolm’s old partner, Vivienne Westwood. They’re going to burn millions of dollars of original punk memorabilia as a way of protesting the commercialization of what was supposed to be a counter-culture scene.”

“NOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!”

Corré released a statement this week, saying that he’s going to burn his entire collection of punk rock stuff  inherited from his dad on November 26th, the 40th anniversary of the release of the Pistols’ “Anarchy in the UK.” Total value of the collection? At least $9 million CAD. He’s also asking that other punks outraged by this appropriation of their culture to join him in the bonfire. From Rolling Stone:

Corré has taken particular umbrage with the corporate and state sponsorship of Punk.London, a year-long series of concerts, film screenings, talks and exhibits. Among its partners are the British Film Institute, the British Fashion Council, Live Nation, Universal Music, the Museum of London and the British Library. Punk.London has also received a £99,000 grant (approximately $140,000) from the National Lottery and the support of the mayor of London.

“The Queen giving 2016, the Year of Punk, her official blessing is the most frightening thing I’ve ever heard,” Corré said. “Talk about alternative and punk culture being appropriated by the mainstream. Rather than a movement for change, punk has become like a fucking museum piece or a tribute act.”

 

I can see his point, but jeez, why not just give that cool stuff to people would treasure it forever?

Alan Cross

is an internationally known broadcaster, interviewer, writer, consultant, blogger and speaker. In his 30+ years in the music business, Alan has interviewed the biggest names in rock, from David Bowie and U2 to Pearl Jam and the Foo Fighters. He’s also known as a musicologist and documentarian through programs like The Ongoing History of New Music.

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