Calling all emerging artists — here’s a panel for you

Are you part of a new or up-and-coming band and feel kind of overwhelmed at what it takes to get your song in front of an audience?

We all know the music industry is not the same place it was last year, let alone 10 years ago or 20, when all you needed was a good song and a few radio stations willing to give you a spin.

MusicTalks is hosting a conversation to help new artists figure out all the options and avenues open to new bands, along with some suggestions on how to navigate it all.

Emerging: An Artist Case Study” is a free panel discussion hosted by Alan Cross – who knows a thing or two about the inner workings of the industry and how artists not only find but maintain success—and industry insiders who will offer their advice on streaming, merchandise and other ways artists can reach an audience.

The event, scheduled for Thursday, March 14, at the Ivey Business School in London, will also feature a performance from Lost in Japan, a London-based group.

Panelists include Jess Seguire of Alley Cat PR, Nathan Quinn of A/R eOne and India Coran of RPM Promotions.

Together, they’ll discuss the role of streaming for musicians trying to kickstart their careers, the importance of touring and how to book a tour to best reach your fans and increase your name recognition, and the role merchandizing can play in boosting not only familiarity but income while touring and while off the road.

The panel also will discuss new revenue models that combine all these aspects to help bands keep themselves operational while touring and working on new music.

The evening will end with a question-and-answer session open to the audience.

In the lead-up to this year’s Junos in London, it’s a great opportunity for bands to equip themselves with the tools they’ll need to be successful and make some money in the process. After all, if there’s no money in the bank, how do you book studio time or production time to finesse that song?

If you’re in London and you’re free Thursday night, this is worth 90 minutes of your time.

Amber Healy

I write about music policy and lawsuits because they're endlessly fascinating.

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