This Dance Club Has Banned DJs with Laptops. Here’s Why.

Back in the day, DJing required fast hands and the confidence to drop beats and samples in real time in front of the dance floor. There was no margin for error. Those with the skillz were revered for their turtablisitic talent.

Then along came the laptop era. Flawless mixes are now often put together ahead of time so that all a DJ has to do is press “play” and they’re off to the races.

Is this cheating? Or just smart use of available technology? One club in Southern California believes that the former is true. Therefore, they’ve banned laptops to “preserve the art of DJing.” Chartattack takes up the story.

Cure And The Cause is the name of a nightclub located in the quaint Los Angeles suburb of Glendale. Its website declares: “We are dedicated to the preservation of house music and the art of djing, this space offers a refuge to those who seek to escape the confines of everyday life….”

Don’t be too romanced by the highfalutin image of an underground pleasuredome — there’s an Olive Garden a block away, Electronic Beats points out. The only reason I know this venue’s name is because a little more than a week ago, owner Kenny Summit made a Facebook post banning DJs from using laptops in his club, igniting a war that’s torn the world of electronic music in two.


Thoughts? (Me? I’m old school. I don’t like the laptop situation. But that’s just me…)

Alan Cross

is an internationally known broadcaster, interviewer, writer, consultant, blogger and speaker. In his 30+ years in the music business, Alan has interviewed the biggest names in rock, from David Bowie and U2 to Pearl Jam and the Foo Fighters. He’s also known as a musicologist and documentarian through programs like The Ongoing History of New Music.

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