Did Dr. Who Give Us the Most Important Electronic Music Ever?

Maybe.  And was this music on par with what the Beatles gave us?  Some think so.  From the BBC:

In a venue called, appropriately enough, the Shoreditch Electric Light Station the musicians who constitute one of the hottest tickets in the London Electronic Arts Festival are taking the stage. These are no digital manipulators or brave-haired superstar DJs. Mostly in their 60s and 70s and sporting a wardrobe of sensible shirts and slacks, they could probably walk unmolested through any rave or bleeding edge sonic arts happening. They’re even playing a matinee show.Yet these five everyday figures – Roger Limb, Paddy Kingsland, Dick Mills, Peter Howell and Mark Ayres – represent one of the most adventurous moments in modern music history. This is the reformed Radiophonic Workshop, carrying the banner for a particular and very British strain of handmade invention.

The avant-garde music known as radiophonics influenced pop from The Beatles through to modern dance music and techno, even though its progenitors were not eccentric art visionaries but salaried BBC engineers and composers who never earned royalties from their work.

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Alan Cross

is an internationally known broadcaster, interviewer, writer, consultant, blogger and speaker. In his 30+ years in the music business, Alan has interviewed the biggest names in rock, from David Bowie and U2 to Pearl Jam and the Foo Fighters. He’s also known as a musicologist and documentarian through programs like The Ongoing History of New Music.

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