Examining the Lasting Impact of Kurt Cobain

It was twenty years ago today–Friday, April 8, 1994–that we heard that Kurt Cobain was dead. I was on the air that afternoon and had to break the news.  It was a crazy, chilling, sad day.

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If you were around when Nirvana blew up into one of the biggest bands in the world, asking why Kurt and Nirvana still matters seems like a stupid question.  It’s self-evident, right?  Yes–to some of us, anyway. But articulating that point to people who were too young (or not even born!) when Kurt died, a thoughtful response is required.

This is what Charles R. Cross tried to do with his book, Here We Are Now: The Lasting Impact of Kurt Cobain.  I spoke to him about it.

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Alan Cross

is an internationally known broadcaster, interviewer, writer, consultant, blogger and speaker. In his 30+ years in the music business, Alan has interviewed the biggest names in rock, from David Bowie and U2 to Pearl Jam and the Foo Fighters. He’s also known as a musicologist and documentarian through programs like The Ongoing History of New Music.

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