Festival d’été de Québec goes BIG for 2020

At 52 years young, Festival d’été de Québec is one of Canada’s longest-running music events. It has also become one of the biggest gathering of fans and artists, stretching across all genres over 11 jam-packed days in July. The 2020 edition will run from July 9-19 and is shaping up to be yuge, and yes I absolutely mean this in a Donald Trumpian sense.

Rage Against the Machine lead the way in terms of FEQ headliners, reunited (again) after nine years with a few things to say no doubt about the upcoming US election between rebellious metal-meets-rap anthems. According to a story in Le Journal de Montréal, the LA rabble rousers were in the midst of planning their comeback around Coachella when they were shown a video of when The Rolling Stones played the festival in 2015. I guess the idea of 100,000 people chanting the infamous refrain to “Killing in the Name” on the historic Plains of Abraham convinced the band that they had to visit Quebec City.

While it’s sure to be one of the most memorable stops on their 50+ date tour, Rage are among almost 150 acts that will invade “La Veille Capitale” this summer. French rockers Les Trois Accords, Halsey, Imagine Dragons, Jack Johnson, Alanis Morissette, G-Eazy, Marshmello, The National & Half Moon Run as well as Sir Rod Stewart are the other bold font performers that will have a night of their own on the Bell-sponsored stage, one of the largest in the world. The full schedule can be found here. Not only does FEQ consistently present a diverse lineup for any music taste in a picturesque setting, it is one of the most affordable values anywhere. $110 is all it costs to get you general admission access to 11 days of concerts – It would actually be cheaper in a lot of ways to buy a full pass, book a flight to Quebec from Toronto plus hotel the Saturday night of Rage Against the Machine than pay for the top-priced ticket for their next show in Hamilton. Talk about Bulls on Parade!

Gilles LeBlanc

Gilles LeBlanc literally fell into “alternative rock” wayyy back at Lollapalooza 1992, where he got caught in his first mosh pit watching some band named Pearl Jam. Since then, he’s spent the better part of his life looking for music to match the liberating rush he felt that day, with a particular chest-beating emphasis on stuff coming out of his native Canada. It took him awhile, but Gilles now writes feverishly about all things that rock (and or roll) through his ROCKthusiast alter ego.

Let us know what you think!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.