Five More Things Internet Radio Could Learn (Steal?) from Terrestrial Radio

I’ll admit it: I’m jealous of the BBC’s Zane Lowe who just landed a prime, prime gig with Apple. There isn’t a radio dude (or dudette, of course) that wouldn’t kill for a job like this.

What this also says to me is that Internet radio knows that regular broadcast radio has value. So does Musically blog:

“So Zane Lowe has announced he’s leaving BBC Radio 1 to join Apple. If we were looking for a sign that the worlds of music streaming and broadcast radio are converging, then a move by iTunes to inject the one thing internet radio has always lacked – presenters – is surely it.

This being Apple, they’ve started by poaching the greatest music broadcaster on the planet. At first sight it looks very much as if internet radio, which turns thirteen this year, might be growing up. But in many other respects it’s still acting its age.

Like a recalcitrant teenager locked in its bedroom with headphones on full volume, personalised radio, to judge from the quality of its music flow anyway, has actually learned very little from its broadcast parent. Slaves to the algorithm, most streaming services are stuck on shuffle, either ignoring or flat-out rejecting anything that smacks of programming as a deviation from the personalisation mantra.

Which is a shame, because broadcast music radio, with its sixty-plus years’ experience finessing format and flow that scream ‘Don’t touch that dial’, could teach webcast a thing or two about optimising reach, share, session length and ad revenue.

 

Read on.

Alan Cross

is an internationally known broadcaster, interviewer, writer, consultant, blogger and speaker. In his 30+ years in the music business, Alan has interviewed the biggest names in rock, from David Bowie and U2 to Pearl Jam and the Foo Fighters. He’s also known as a musicologist and documentarian through programs like The Ongoing History of New Music.

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