Home workouts powered by Dua Lipa, SAINt JHN, The Weeknd and Kanye

If you’ve been getting creative and working out at home during this (good grief will it ever end) pandemic, newly scrubbed Spotify recor–er, data suggests Dua Lipa might have been on at least one of your playlists. 

PureGym went through data users freely and possibly unknowingly provided to Spotify (they’re always “learning,” you know) to track which artists powered home-based workouts over the past year. Among the findings, SAINt JHN’s Roses was featured in 382 home workout playlists, making it the most commonly played song for at-home athletes.

Dua Lipa, however, was added onto the most playlists, showing up on 1,337 sweaty soundtrack options. 

In total, PureGym looked at more than 145,000 songs specifically designated on playlists made by private individuals for use in their private homes or other workout locations, for use in their own private ears. 

The full top 10 song list includes

  1. Roses – Imanbek Remix – SAINt JHN (featured in 382 home workout playlists)
  2. Blinding Lights – The Weeknd (363)
  3. Don’t Start Now – Dua Lipa (322)
  4. Head & Heart (feat. MNEK) – Joel Corry (269)
  5. Physical – Dua Lipa (253)
  6. Lose Control – MEDUZA (235)
  7. Boss B*tch – Doja Cat (183)
  8. Dance Monkey – Tones And I (179)
  9. Breaking Me – Topic (178)
  10. ‘Till I Collapse – Eminem (177)
     

Shifting gears ever so slightly, these same PureGym data crunchers found that the top 10 artists, after Dua Lip, were Drake, who appeared on 1,047 playlists, Eminem (903), Kanye West (884), David Guetta (778), Tiesto (704), The Weeknd (693), Calvin Harris (690), Megan Thee Stallion (686) and Ariana Grande (679). 

“We know how important the right music is to working out, no matter where you are,” says Stephen Rowe, chief marketing officer for PureGym. “That’s why you’ll hear carefully curated playlists in our gyms and we wanted to find a way we could extend this outside of the gym, too.” 

The findings were released in the hopes of inspiring other people to utilize the PureGym app and use of its 400 workouts and maybe make more playlists or something. 

More information and downloadable playlists can be found here

Amber Healy

I write about music policy and lawsuits because they're endlessly fascinating.

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