If you buy concert tickets on the secondary market, you’ll be happy about this. (Why hasn’t this received more attention?)

Ever buy tickets for a hot show from a secondary ticket seller only to later realize (too late!) that the listed price is in US dollars? Given the exchange rate, that can be a very nasty surprise. That $179 ticket actually turned out to cost $237.

The good news is that there is now pending legislation (in Ontario, anyway) that will require all secondary sellers to list ticket prices in Canadian dollars. I quote:

Schedule 10
Ticket Sales Act, 2017

The Schedule amends the Ticket Sales Act, 2017 to require ticket businesses to ensure that the ticket purchaser is offered a ticket, and charged, in Canadian currency.

Nice. But how do you enforce this? That’s still to be determined.

Meanwhile, though, be very careful with what sellers turn up high atop Google searches. Stick with resellers that have a presence in Canada (for example, TicketsNow, StubHub, and few others.)

Alan Cross

is an internationally known broadcaster, interviewer, writer, consultant, blogger and speaker. In his 30+ years in the music business, Alan has interviewed the biggest names in rock, from David Bowie and U2 to Pearl Jam and the Foo Fighters. He’s also known as a musicologist and documentarian through programs like The Ongoing History of New Music.

One thought on “If you buy concert tickets on the secondary market, you’ll be happy about this. (Why hasn’t this received more attention?)

  • December 9, 2019 at 11:06 am
    Permalink

    I think this will end up being yet another ticketing law with no teeth, since it’s difficult to police the Internet, just like with provincial governments attempting to ban scalping when the sites aren’t hosted in the province.

    Reply

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