If You’re a Music Snob, You’ll Love This New Spotify Feature

Rock Snob

 

Every music fan wants to believe that their taste is exquisite, more refined and far more sophisticated. We (and I include myself in this group; it’s a failing, I know) also want to think we have the ability to jump on artists and sounds and scenes before anyone else. Sure, we can claim that we’ve already moved on from the band you’ve just discovered, but we’re probably lying. “I was into that band four years ago. I’m bored with them now.” That kind of thing.

Now there’s a way to prove that we were into bands long before the mainstream (or even some hardcore music obsessives) learned of their existence. It’s Spotify’s “Found Them First” tool. From The Verge.

Is streaming destroying the music industry? It’s hard to say, but Spotify certainly wants to destroy the enjoyment of music with its rampant enabling of music snobs. The company has unveiled a new tool called “Found them First” that lets users find which artists they were listening to before the rest of the world caught on. The webpage scans Spotify users’ listening history, and tells them if they were an “early listener” for a breakout artist, defining these as acts that have accumulated more than 20 million total streams as well as a growth rate of at least 2,000 percent between January 2013 and June this year.

If you’re a hardcore music fan who loves to be first on everything, tell me that you’re not drooling at the prospect of using this thing. I dare you.

 

Alan Cross

is an internationally known broadcaster, interviewer, writer, consultant, blogger and speaker. In his 30+ years in the music business, Alan has interviewed the biggest names in rock, from David Bowie and U2 to Pearl Jam and the Foo Fighters. He’s also known as a musicologist and documentarian through programs like The Ongoing History of New Music.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.