Jay-Z is apparently going to buy into an NFL team. Colin Kaepernick? Never mind.

Earlier in the week, Jay-Z’s Roc Nation entered into a some kind of strategic relationship with the NFL to advise on live music events produced by the league, including the Super Bowl halftime show.

Yesterday (August 16) it was announced that Jay-Z is going to get something he’s wanted for years: a piece of an NFL franchise.

Which team? Don’t know. When? Soon. And what about Jay-Z principled stand on social justice in the NFL and his support of the banished Colin Kaepernick? The support that apparently prompted him to turn down playing the Super Bowl? Never mind.

Jay-Z: “I think we’ve moved past kneeling and I think it’s time to go into actionable items.” (More yada yada yada here.)

The backlash has been swift and serious.

Colin Kaepernick’s girlfriend, Nessa Diab: “We will never turn our backs on @kaepernick7 because your idols decided to work with the same organization that is actively keeping Colin unemployed all because he peacefully protested against social injustice in black and brown communities, specifically police brutality. So really, how can Jay-Z and the NFL utter social justice in their partnership while keeping Colin unemployed because of his social justice work?

“What is disgusting and disappointing is Jay-Z let them use him. Whether Jay-Z knew it or not (I don’t doubt his intelligence – so I would think he knew) he helped the NFL bury who he said is an iconic figure.”

Eric Reed, former teammate on the Carolina Panthers and fellow knee-taker: “Jay-Z knowingly made a money move with the very people who’ve committed an injustice against Colin and is using social justice to smooth it over with the black community.”

Columnist Mark Maden: “Jay-Z sold out Colin Kaepernick all the way to the bank.” (Link)

And then there’s this:

More analysis here. You can also read more here.

Alan Cross

is an internationally known broadcaster, interviewer, writer, consultant, blogger and speaker. In his 30+ years in the music business, Alan has interviewed the biggest names in rock, from David Bowie and U2 to Pearl Jam and the Foo Fighters. He’s also known as a musicologist and documentarian through programs like The Ongoing History of New Music.

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