Lawyers weigh in on the Nirvana baby child porn lawsuit

The biggest music story of the week remains the lawsuit brought forth by Spencer Elden, the all-grown-up baby we’ve seen on the cover of Nirvana’s Nevermind album for the last 30 years. After decades of dining out on his little bit of fame, he’s decided that the photo is exploitive and is a form of child porn. (I summarize everything here.)

As you might expect, other lawyers are weighing in on the case–and they’re not very sympathetic to Spencer’s cause. The New York Post canvassed a few legal experts on the matter.

Lawyer Jamie White, who’s represented thousands of survivors of childhood sexual abuse, called the case brought by Spencer Elden, now 30, “just outrageous on so many levels.”

“I’ve never seen a more offensive, frivolous lawsuit in the history of my career,” said White, whose clients include people victimized by pedophile priests, Boy Scout leaders and notorious ex-USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar.

“Not only do I not think this lawsuit will hold water, I think the attorneys will be scrutinized for even filing this thing,” he said.

White, whose firm is located in Okemos, Mich., also called the suit “really offensive to the true victims” of child pornography, saying that “the people that traffic in this garbage do it for sexual gratification.”

“The idea that the Nirvana album is for the purpose of gratification sexually is just such a ridiculous outrage,” he said.

“This is a money grab and … I would look for a court to dismiss because it’s frivolous and it really is offensive to what we have all been doing in trying to protect children from the harm they are alleging here,” White said.

Rolling Stone also consulted a series of lawyers. None of them think that this case has a prayer.

Meanwhile, it’s also reported that there have been related lawsuits filed by some other album cover babies (via Tom).

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Alan Cross

is an internationally known broadcaster, interviewer, writer, consultant, blogger and speaker. In his 40+ years in the music business, Alan has interviewed the biggest names in rock, from David Bowie and U2 to Pearl Jam and the Foo Fighters. He’s also known as a musicologist and documentarian through programs like The Ongoing History of New Music.

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