Random music news for Thursday, February 10, 2022

Video games that spy on us? Oh, dear. Worry about that after you take in some music news for February 10, 2022.

  1. Interesting read: “In Their Own Words: Why Artists are Leaving Spotify.”
  2. And then there’s this: “Spotify’s Quest to own Your Ear.” (Via Bobby)
  3. Here’s a story on the changing world of A&R at record labels.
  4. Live music’s “plan B.” What is that, anyway? Is there one?
  5. Meanwhile in Florida, there’s a drunk Mick Jagger imposter causing problems.
  6. Ol’ Dirty Bastard’s widow wants royalties from Wu-Tang Clan.
  7. And even though everyone in the Jimi Hendrix Experience is long dead, their estates are still fighting over royalties.
  8. What the hell is going on with the Bored Ape Yacht Club? Here’s a history of one of the world’s weirdest NFTs.
  9. The biggest app download of 2021? TikTok.
  10. If you need endangered monkeys to mate, this might work.
  11. Another physical magazine goes away. Goodby Entertainment Weekly, print edition.
  12. This is a very, very weird radio glitch.

More news? Look here.

BONUS: Imagine if this were your gig. How do you get into such a line of work, anyway?

Alan Cross

is an internationally known broadcaster, interviewer, writer, consultant, blogger and speaker. In his 40+ years in the music business, Alan has interviewed the biggest names in rock, from David Bowie and U2 to Pearl Jam and the Foo Fighters. He’s also known as a musicologist and documentarian through programs like The Ongoing History of New Music.

2 thoughts on “Random music news for Thursday, February 10, 2022

  • February 11, 2022 at 10:15 pm
    Permalink

    I didn’t get a brand new car until I was 37. It was a thing of beauty (and a sensible choice. This is not my dream car: a 51 split window bug. One owner, preferably from the little old man who, of course, has long since kicked the bucket, but had it in a little alley off H street in downtown Sacramento when I was 18.

    No, my Mazda was everything I didn’t know I ever wanted in a car and then some. I *loved* that car like no other and I’ve been awfully attached to a couple of my cars and I’ve spent about half my life without a car. Ir was a 2004 Mazda 3. It was the right choice because it had good gas mileage, great consumer reports ratings, great insurance prices and looked good and was a really great price. It had good features and the extras they threw in, I ended up loving. It was new to the market and there were few on the road.

    Then more people started buying them and they gained in popularity. As they did (I assume), the quality suffered. One terrible day in February 2013 a woman ran a red light and killed my poor car. What did I do? Get a 2013 Mazda 3, of course. Research? No! I researched my first Mazda (and others ending up with a final 3) for six solid months. When I research, I *research*.

    My new car? I HATE it. I would totally drive it into a brick wall in every way possible if I could claim someone else did it to get the insurance money to buy ANOTHER car and NOT a Mazda. They haven’t updated *anything*. They TOOK AWAY features. No bells and whistles here besides the trunk pop. Oooooh. Phooey!

    I’m not surprised that anything can brick these things in any way. They are utterly crude devices that make a mockery of what Mazda was doing in 2004. I laughed my head off when I read this article yesterday (I live about 2 1/2 hours south of Seattle.) and just said ‘Of course it happened to a Mazda.’.

    Beware, there be dragons (or bugs) here.

    Reply
  • March 7, 2022 at 5:37 am
    Permalink

    Just gave up my 2013 Mazda 3. It was our first car, used, and we weren’t expecting much. The fact that it handled Bluetooth was good enough.

    A friend “just” (before COVID) got a 2020, and though they paid for an upgraded console, not standard at the time, it’s pretty damn slick. Though with all the ‘heads up display’ stuff going on, the fuel gauge is buried and that caused some consternation once.

    Reply

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