Recommended Reading: The Oral History of 45 Iconic Hits That Changed Rock, R&B and Pop

anatomy-of-a-song-marc-myers

This sounds like my kind of book. From Salon:

What goes into making a timeless popular song? That’s what longtime music journalist Marc Myers went looking for in 2011 when he began a Wall Street Journal column called “Anatomy of a Song.” The column has now become a book, released today and subtitled “The Oral History of 45 Iconic Hits That Changed Rock, R&B and Pop.”

The book begins by discussing Lloyd Price’s “Lawdy Miss Clawdy,” from 1952 and after working its way through songs by The Kinks, Otis Redding, Blondie and others, concludes with R.E.M.’s 1991 hit “Losing My Religion.”

The Clash song “London Calling,” the title (and leadoff) track to one of the greatest albums in rock history, appears at No. 40, near the book’s end. To understand how the 1979 song came together, Myers tracked down the band’s guitarist and songwriter Mick Jones, its bassist Paul Simon and Clash drummer Topper Headon. (Singer and co-writer Joe Strummer and producer Guy Stevens are both deceased.)

Salon spoke to Myers, who is the author of the book “Why Jazz Happened” and the blogger behind JazzWax.com, who was at his home in New York.

Read the interview here.

Alan Cross

is an internationally known broadcaster, interviewer, writer, consultant, blogger and speaker. In his 30+ years in the music business, Alan has interviewed the biggest names in rock, from David Bowie and U2 to Pearl Jam and the Foo Fighters. He’s also known as a musicologist and documentarian through programs like The Ongoing History of New Music.

One thought on “Recommended Reading: The Oral History of 45 Iconic Hits That Changed Rock, R&B and Pop

  • November 2, 2016 at 10:38 am
    Permalink

    Great list of 45 songs – but no Beatles.

    Reply

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