So 11 Million People Are Trying Apple Music. What Does That Really Mean?

I’m one of those 11 million, but I confess that I’m not listening as much as I thought I would.  I blame the confusing interface and the learning curve.  Music Industry Blog looks a little deeper into that number.

Apple’s announcement that it hit 11 million trialists to Apple Music just 5 weeks after launching has divided opinion as to whether the milestone constitutes success or failure.  It is probably a bit of both:

  • The glass half full perspective: No other streaming service has converted so many consumers so quickly.  Although it is not a like-for-like comparison, 5 weeks after launching its premium tier Spotify had less than 100,000 paying subscribers.  Apple’s early follower product strategy entails waiting for a sector to be ready for primetime before entering it.  Such scale so quickly suggests Apple has timed its entry well here.
  • The glass half empty perspective: It is a very different market now than in 2008 when Spotify launched.  Streaming music listening on mobiles is widespread and awareness of subscriptions is high.  Also Apple hasn’t actually got anyone to part with cash yet.  11 million trialists represents about 10% of the Apple customers that bought music from iTunes in 2014, so the majority of those consumers have not adopted yet.  Also Apple has a well-earned reputation for getting the majority of its iOS users to adopt iOS updates quickly.  So the vast majority of iOS 8.4 users have not yet adopted.

Just How Many Subscribers Will 11 Million Trialists Turn Into?

The biggest issue with the milestone is that we are talking about trialists not subscribers.  So these numbers are an early indicator of likely performance rather than performance metrics in their own right.

Keep reading.

Alan Cross

is an internationally known broadcaster, interviewer, writer, consultant, blogger and speaker. In his 30+ years in the music business, Alan has interviewed the biggest names in rock, from David Bowie and U2 to Pearl Jam and the Foo Fighters. He’s also known as a musicologist and documentarian through programs like The Ongoing History of New Music.

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