The Ongoing History of New Music, episode 893: The history of punk-punk, part 1

Before we get to the topic at hand, I’d like to revisit the movie Forrest Gump, specifically Forrest’s shrimp boat buddy, Benjamin Buford Blue, but you can just call him Bubba. He knew all the ways once could serve up shrimp.

What Bubba could do for shrimp, other people did for punk. Punk rock comes in as many different varieties as shrimp.

There’s classic punk, hardcore punk, ska-punk, cyberpunk, synthpunk, anarcho-punk, cowpunk, gypsy punk, Christian punk, Celtic punk, art-punk, garage-punk, glam-punk, crust-punk, horror-punk, street-punk, melodic punk, Afro-punk, skate-punk, Chicano punk, folk-punk, and trall punk (I don’t know what that is, but it exists.).

We also have punk blues, punk pathetique, punk metal, riot grrrl, queercore, rapcore, straight edge, emo, and oi. Plus there’s a plethora of sub-sub-genres, including bent edge, deathcore, pornogrind, screamo, powerviolence, positive hardcore, nard core, nintendocore…and that’s about I know about that.

Most of these punk derivatives are pretty niche-y and few have a hope in hell of growing beyond a cult following. But a few have blown up into worldwide phenomenons, including a version I haven’t mentioned yet, which remains one of the most popular forms of punk rock of all time.

This is the history of pop-punk, part one.

Songs heard on this show:

  • Blink-182, All the Small Things
  • Ramones, Baby I Love You
  • The Jam, That’s Entertainment
  • Buzzcocks, What Do I Get?
  • Gen X, Dancing with Myself
  • Black Flag, TV Party
  • Bad Religion, We’re Only Gonna Die
  • Husker Du, Pink Turns to Blue
  • Social Distortion, Another State of Mind
  • The Vandals, Summer Lovin’
  • Green Day, Welcome to Paradise (original version)

Eric Wilhite has this playlist for us.

The Ongoing History of New Music can be heard on the following stations:

We’re still looking for more affiliates in Calgary, Kamloops, Kelowna, Regina, Saskatoon, Brandon, Windsor,  Montreal, Halifax, Charlottetown, Moncton, Fredericton, and St John’s and anywhere else with a transmitter. If you’re in any of those markets and you want the show, lemme know and I’ll see what I can do.

If you ever miss a show, you can always get the podcast edition available through Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you get your on-demand audio.

Alan Cross

is an internationally known broadcaster, interviewer, writer, consultant, blogger and speaker. In his 30+ years in the music business, Alan has interviewed the biggest names in rock, from David Bowie and U2 to Pearl Jam and the Foo Fighters. He’s also known as a musicologist and documentarian through programs like The Ongoing History of New Music.

One thought on “The Ongoing History of New Music, episode 893: The history of punk-punk, part 1

  • October 6, 2020 at 9:55 am
    Permalink

    Hi Alan,
    1st of all, I love your show and have been listening for many years.
    I think there might be a typo in your title Punk-Punk? Did you mean Pop-Punk?
    Cheers from France

    Reply

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