There’s an updated list of the best-selling albums of all time (in the US, anyway)

The RIAA, the group representing the American recorded music industry, is also responsible for determining awards for album sales (i.e. diamond, platinum, and gold). As such, they occasionally release a list of the highest-selling albums in the US.

This is a lot trickier than you might think because the American industry has only been counting album sales one-by-one since the SoundScan system was introduced in 1991. Before then, all we have to go are estimates by record retailers and the labels’ word on how many records they sold. Even then, we only have the roundest of round numbers, which explains why the rankings get murky and inexact after tenth place.

In other words, take some of these numbers with a grain of salt. (Via Digital Music News)

  1. Eagles — Their Greatest Hits 1971 — 1975 — 38 million
  2. Michael Jackson — Thriller — 33 million
  3. Eagles — Hotel California — 26 million
  4. AC/DC — Back in Black — 25 million
  5. The Beatles — The Beatles — 24 million
  6. Billy Joel — Greatest Hits Volume I & Volume II — 23 million
  7. Led Zeppelin — Led Zeppelin IV — 23 million
  8. Pink Floyd — The Wall — 23 million
  9. Garth Brooks — Double Live — 21 million
  10. Hootie & the Blowfish — Cracked Rear View — 21 million
  • Fleetwood Mac — Rumours — 20 million
  • Shania Twain — Come On Over — 20 million
  • Garth Brooks — No Fences — 18 million
  • Guns N’ Roses — Appetite for Destruction — 18 million
  • Whitney Houston — The Bodyguard (Soundtrack) — 18 million
  • Boston — Boston — 17 million
  • Elton John — Greatest Hits — 17 million
  • The Beatles — The Beatles 1967 — 1970 — 17 million
  • Alanis Morissette — Jagged Little Pill — 16 million
  • Bee Gees — Saturday Night Fever (Soundtrack) — 16 million
  • Led Zeppelin — Physical Graffiti — 16 million
  • Metallica — Metallica — 16 million
  • Bob Marley & The Wailers — Legend — 15 million
  • Bruce Springsteen — Born in the U.S.A. — 15 million
  • Journey — Greatest Hits — 15 million
  • Pink Floyd — Dark Side of the Moon — 15 million
  • Santana — Supernatural — 15 million
  • The Beatles —  The Beatles 1962—1966 — 15 million
  • Adele — 21 — 14 million
  • Backstreet Boys — Backstreet Boys — 14 million
  • Britney Spears — Baby One More Time — 14 million
  • Garth Brooks — Ropin’ in the Wind — 14 million
  • Meat Loaf — Bat Out of Hell — 14 million
  • Simon & Garfunkel — Simon & Garfunkel’s Greatest Hits — 14 million
  • Steve Miller Band — Greatest Hits 1974 — 1978 — 14 million
  • Backstreet Boys — Millennium — 13 million
  • Bruce Springsteen — Bruce Springsteen & E Street Band Live 1975 — ’85 — 13 million
  • Pearl Jam — Ten — 13 million
  • Prince & The Revolution — Purple Rain (Soundtrack) — 13 million
  • The Chicks — Wide Open Spaces — 13 million
  • Whitney Houston — Whitney Houston — 13 million
  • Bon Jovi — Slippery When Wet — 12 million
  • Boyz II Men — II — 12 million
  • Def Leppard — Hysteria — 12 million
  • Jewel — Pieces of You — 12 million
  • Kenny G — Breathless — 12 million
  • Kenny Rogers — Kenny Rogers’ Greatest Hits — 12 million
  • Led Zeppelin — Led Zeppelin II — 12 million
  • Linkin Park — Hybrid Theory — 12 million
  • Matchbox Twenty — Yourself or Someone Like You — 12 million
  • Phil Collins — No Jacket Required — 12 million
  • Shania Twain — The Woman in Me — 12 million
  • Soundtrack — Forrest Gump — 12 million
  • The Beatles — Abbey Road — 12 million
  • The Rolling Stones — Hot Rocks — 12 million
  • TLC — CrazySexyCool — 12 million
  • Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers — Greatest Hits — 12 million
  • Adele — 25 — 11 million
  • Aerosmith — Aerosmith’s Greatest Hits — 11 million
  • Celine Dion — Falling Into You — 11 million
  • Creed — Human Clay — 11 million
  • Eagles — Eagles Greatest Hits Volume II — 11 million
  • James Taylor — James Taylor’s Greatest Hits — 11 million
  • Kid Rock — Devil Without A Cause — 11 million
  • Led Zeppelin — Houses of the Holy — 11 million
  • N’SYNC — No Strings Attached — 11 million
  • Notorious B.I.G. — Life After Death — 11 million
  • Outkast — Speakerboxxx/ The Love Below — 11 million
  • Shania Twain — Up! — 11 million
  • Soundtrack — Titanic — 11 million
  • Soundtrack — Dirty Dancing — 11 million
  • The Beatles — Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band — 11 million
  • The Beatles — 1 — 11 million
  • The Chicks — Fly — 11 million
  • 2 Pac — All Eyez On Me — 10 million
  • 2 Pac — Greatest Hits — 10 million
  • Beastie Boys — Licensed To Ill — 10 million
  • Billy Joel — The Stranger — 10 million
  • Bob Seger & the Silver Bullet Band — Greatest Hits — 10 million
  • Britney Spears — Oops! ..I Did It Again — 10 million
  • Carole King — Tapestry — 10 million
  • Celine Dion — Let’s Talk About Love — 10 million
  • Creedence Clearwater Revival — Chronicle: 20 Greatest Hits — 10 million
  • Def Leppard — Pyromania — 10 million
  • Doobie Brothers — Best of the Doobies — 10 million
  • Elvis Presley — Elvis’ Christmas Album — 10 million
  • Eminem — The Marshall Mathers LP — 10 million
  • Eminem — The Eminem Show — 10 million
  • Eric Clapton — Unplugged — 10 million
  • Garth Brooks — The Chase — 10 million
  • Garth Brooks — The Ultimate Hits — 10 million
  • Garth Brooks — The Hits — 10 million
  • Garth Brooks — Garth Brooks — 10 million
  • Garth Brooks — In Pieces — 10 million
  • Garth Brooks — Sevens — 10 million
  • George Michael — Faith — 10 million
  • Green Day — Dookie — 10 million
  • Hammer — Please Hammer Don’t Hurt ‘Em — 10 million
  • Led Zeppelin — Led Zeppelin — 10 million
  • Lionel Richie — Can’t Slow Down — 10 million

Alan Cross

is an internationally known broadcaster, interviewer, writer, consultant, blogger and speaker. In his 40+ years in the music business, Alan has interviewed the biggest names in rock, from David Bowie and U2 to Pearl Jam and the Foo Fighters. He’s also known as a musicologist and documentarian through programs like The Ongoing History of New Music.

2 thoughts on “There’s an updated list of the best-selling albums of all time (in the US, anyway)

  • November 11, 2020 at 6:43 am
    Permalink

    This list is always a bit skewed because the RIAA counts units as the number of discs sold rather than packages sold. So that is why you see a lot of double albums on the list: each sale of the White Album, the Wall or Billy Joel’s Greatest Hits counts as two units sold. And Springsteen Live ‘75-‘85 had five LPs/three CDs, so the multiplier for that one is even bigger.

    Reply
  • November 11, 2020 at 8:15 am
    Permalink

    All of Garth Brooks’ albums need an asterix next to them, as he’s been gaming Soundscan for decades by endlessly reissuing his albums in discount box sets so he can inflate his numbers in an attempt to artificially make a claim as one of the best-selling artists of all time.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.