Which Are the Most HATED Band of the Millennium So Far?

Salon looks at the most reviled, most hated rock band in detail here.  This is an executive summary of Salon’s list along with some commentary from me.

1. Nickelback

Goes without saying, really. While I can understand how any band can have its detractors, I’m still baffled by the intensity of hatred that’s directed toward Nickelback. Fine, dislike them. But to hate them this much?

2. 98 Degrees

There are plenty of other boy bands that cause rage within me. This band never really registered on my hate-o-meter.

3. Smash Mouth

Really?  What did this innocuous band do to anyone other than release some catchy alt-rock ditties in the late 90s? Their version of the Monkees’ “I’m a Believer” is a great cover.

4. Black Eyed Peas

Is it because they sold so many albums?

5. Insane Clown Posse

Sorry, but I like ICP. I don’t much for their music (the sublime “Miracles” aside), but I love that they and their fans don’t give a f*ck about what the world thinks. We need more of that.

6. Hootie and the Blowfish

I’m grateful to them for allowing 54-40 to earn some hard currency thanks to their cover of “I Go Blind.” Beyond that, I don’t care.

7. The Goo Goo Dolls

Yes, they’re still around. I barely give them a thought.

8. John Mayer

Next to Adam Levine, he’s the douchiest man in music. And by the way, why isn’t Adam and Maroon 5 on this list.

9. Dave Matthews Band

Boring? Maybe. But reviled?

10. Creed

Do I really need to explain this one. No contest.

11. Train

Another band I barely think of.

12. Phish

Whatever. Hate them if you want. Seems like a waste of energy.

13. Limp Bizkit

The perfect ending to this list.

Anyone else that’s missing? Keep in mind that the criteria is that the mere mention of the band’s name must immediately result in hot, irrational hatred. What about Puddle of Mudd, Days of the New, Theory of a Deadman, post-St. Anger Metallica…

(Via Tom)

Alan Cross

is an internationally known broadcaster, interviewer, writer, consultant, blogger and speaker. In his 30+ years in the music business, Alan has interviewed the biggest names in rock, from David Bowie and U2 to Pearl Jam and the Foo Fighters. He’s also known as a musicologist and documentarian through programs like The Ongoing History of New Music.

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