Your taste in music could be sabotaging your relationship

Dating is hard. Maintaining a serious relationship is even harder. Sure, you probably have plenty of things in common. But what about those points of difference? And what if those differences include divergent musical tastes?

That could be a problem. A big one.

According to FastCompany, an online ticket broker called TickPick issued something called “Music Deal Breakers,” which look at how musical tastes affected relationships.

Here are some topline results:

  1. Nearly 1 in 5 will not date a person with “bad” taste in music.
  2. Nearly 1 in 4 people who found rap unattractive will refuse to date someone who preferred it.
  3. Breaking that down a little further, women are slightly more tolerant of “bad” music in their partner than men (46% to 54%)
  4. 19% of women and 7% of women wouldn’t have sex with someone with different musical tastes.
  5. The most preferred music genre of sexually submissive people? For men, it’s alternative (33%) and for women, it’s classic rock (31%).
  6. 45% of men people that hip-hop is the most unattractive genre. That’s too bad because 39% of women think that hip-hop is the most attractive.
  7. A musical turn-on for men? Classic rock (41%). The biggest turn-off for women? Metal (37%).
  8. If you and your partner agree on classic rock, oldies, jazz, country or folk, you probably rate your relationship 8.5 out of 10 or higher.
  9. If we draw a Venn diagram of the musical preferences of men and women, the sweet spot is classic rock with About 80% of couples will be okay with that choice.
  10. Alternative scored 33% (second to classic rock) in the top five most attractive music preferences of both men and women.
  11. 35% of single people cannot stand to listen to certain music anymore because it reminds them of an ex.
  12. And finally, there’s this tip: 81% of people who went to a concert on a first date ended up going on a second date.

Read the full report here.

Alan Cross

is an internationally known broadcaster, interviewer, writer, consultant, blogger and speaker. In his 30+ years in the music business, Alan has interviewed the biggest names in rock, from David Bowie and U2 to Pearl Jam and the Foo Fighters. He’s also known as a musicologist and documentarian through programs like The Ongoing History of New Music.

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