The Ongoing History of New Music, episode 952: The history of hardcore punk

One of the things that makes rock great is the energy and power that comes with the music. And depending on where you go, that energy can vary from place to place.

If you’re looking to exorcise a little aggression, anger, and frustration, you have several choices. There are various flavours of metal that will serve your purpose, ranging from melodic metal (Metallica’s “Enter Sandman,” for example) along with Sabbath and Ozzy to the straight-from-hell insanity of black and death metal.

Industrial music is another option. Guitars, synths, and heavy beats from acts like Nine Inch Nails, Marilyn Manson, and Ministry. A third option is punk rock. It comes in many varieties, so there’s almost something for everyone.

But if you really want pure adrenalin, something aggressive, something very physical, something primal, and something that can be dangerous and violent, there’s one particular part of the punk world that you’ll find attractive.

It’s a space where things can’t be too hard, too fast, or too angry. And for many people, this scene isn’t just music: it’s a lifestyle and even a lifesaver. It isn’t for everyone, but we’ll see that its influence has extended far, far beyond just a bunch of guys yelling over loud guitars.

Misunderstood? Maybe. Important? Definitely. This is the history of hardcore.

Songs heard on this show (and they’re all awfully short, so that’s why there are so many):

  • Suicidal Tendencies, Institutionalized
  • The Middle Class, Out of Vogue
  • Black Flag, Nervous Breakdown
  • Circle Jerks, Deny Everything
  • The Germs, Forming
  • Bad Religion, Bad Religion
  • Dead Kennedys, California Uber Alles
  • DOA, DOA
  • Bad Brains, Pay to Cum
  • Minor Threat, Straight Edge
  • The Misfits, Horror Business
  • The Replacements, I’m in Trouble
  • Husker Du, Pinks Turns to Blue
  • Nomeansno, Two Lips Two Lungs and One Tongue
  • Discharge, Hear Nothing See Nothing Say Nothing
  • Turnstile, Mystery

Check out the playlist from Eric Wilhite.

The Ongoing History of New Music can be heard on the following stations:

We’re still looking for more affiliates in Calgary, Kamloops, Kelowna, Regina, Saskatoon, Brandon, Windsor,  Montreal, Charlottetown, Moncton, Fredericton, and St John’s, and anywhere else with a transmitter. If you’re in any of those markets and you want the show, lemme know and I’ll see what I can do.

Alan Cross

is an internationally known broadcaster, interviewer, writer, consultant, blogger and speaker. In his 40+ years in the music business, Alan has interviewed the biggest names in rock, from David Bowie and U2 to Pearl Jam and the Foo Fighters. He’s also known as a musicologist and documentarian through programs like The Ongoing History of New Music.

One thought on “The Ongoing History of New Music, episode 952: The history of hardcore punk

  • May 2, 2022 at 11:18 am
    Permalink

    Fwiw I’m thrilled to see NoMeansNo in the track listing.

    Reply

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