Mariah Carey Is Not of This Earth, Part…Whatever

I spent 31 hours flying back from Mauritius–an island in the Indian Ocean on the far side of Africa–in economy, of course.  Fortunately, I was able to get an emergency row seat which meant a little more legroom.  The crying babies and the fussy moms were a bit of an annoyance, but that’s what eye shades, ear plugs and industrial-strength sleeping pills however.

The three-hour layover at CDG in Paris was nice, too.  Who wouldn’t want to relax with a salmon tartar and a glass of  Pouilly-Fumé  at 8:30 in the morning.  All things considered, it was about as painless has a halfway-around-the-planet ride can be.  Good job, Air Mauritius and Air Canada.

This, however, pales in comparison to the  £70,000 Mariah Carey spent on a securing a one-way flight from New York to France on British Airways next month.  To repeat, that’s  £70,000 ($130,000-ish CAD).  One way.

Carey, you see, hates her fans–and apparently people in general.  Rather than risk being disturbed on the 7 hour flight, she ordered her minions to purchase the entire first class cabin on a British Airways flight.  .

It’s not like she can’t afford it.  She has a personal net worth in the $500 million range, so $130,000 is probably what the maids find in the couch cushions each day.

Now I’m no expert on private charters, but it seems to me that $130,000 would be more than enough to secure something from NetJets or any number of other companies that would avoid all aspects of commercial aviation. Hell, I’m surprised she doesn’t have her own jet like a Challenger 600 fueled up for DefCon 1 shopping emergencies 24/7/365.  She could even afford some configuration of a Boeing Business Jet.

Here’s what a representative told The Sun: “Over the years Mariah has grown accustomed to travelling in ultimate style so she doesn’t think twice about paying such a crazy amount to ensure her privacy.”

(Via Music-News.com)

 

Alan Cross

is an internationally known broadcaster, interviewer, writer, consultant, blogger and speaker. In his 30+ years in the music business, Alan has interviewed the biggest names in rock, from David Bowie and U2 to Pearl Jam and the Foo Fighters. He’s also known as a musicologist and documentarian through programs like The Ongoing History of New Music.

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