What’s the Neuroscience Behind Singing?

Why do humans feel the need to sing? And why does singing seem to be so good for us? Tom points us to this article at UpLift:

The science is in. Singing is really, really good for you and the most recent research suggests that group singing is the most exhilarating and transformative of all. On top of that, the educational value of singing has been known for a long time, particularly for young children. This is why songs for babies should be played by parents to their children.

The good feelings we get from singing in a group are a kind of evolutionary reward for coming together cooperatively.

The research suggests that creating music together evolved as a tool of social living. Groups and tribes sang and danced together to build loyalty, transmit vital information and ward off enemies.

Science Supports Singing

What has not been understood until recently is that singing in groups triggers the communal release of serotonin and oxytocin, the bonding hormone, and even synchronises our heart beats.

Group singing literally incentivised community over an “each cave dweller for themselves” approach. Those who sang together were strongly bonded and survived.

Read more here.

Alan Cross

is an internationally known broadcaster, interviewer, writer, consultant, blogger and speaker. In his 30+ years in the music business, Alan has interviewed the biggest names in rock, from David Bowie and U2 to Pearl Jam and the Foo Fighters. He’s also known as a musicologist and documentarian through programs like The Ongoing History of New Music.

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