System of a Down to premiere new single during live stream fundraiser

Need more System of a Down in your pandemic life? It’ll cost you — while helping support humanitarian efforts in Armenia. 

The band announced it will host a live streaming fundraiser event on their YouTube page on Saturday, January 30, to release “Genocidal Humanoidz,” the second single from their new album, released in November. 

“In the tragic aftermath of the most egregious violence to affect the area since 1994, soldiers for the Defense Army of Artsakh and Armenia suffered war crimes at the hands of the invaders — Azerbaijan abetted by Turkey and their Syrian mercenaries,” the band says. 

The livestream will help raise money to rehabilitate and prepare soldiers who have been gravely injured in the conflict and are now in need of prosthetic arms and legs. It will also help support innovative new laser therapy for treating chemical burns for those volunteer soldiers who were exposed to illegal white phosphorous weapons.

The event will start at noon EST/ 9 a.m. PT and will feature a laundry list of special guests: Maria Mehranian of the Armenia Fund USA, Armenian-American musician Sebu Simonian, Araksya Karapetyan of Good Day LA, Parliamentarian Narek Mkrtchyan who is also working on developing a new prosthetic hand in conjunction with the Homeland Defenders Rehabilitation Center, Deep Sky Animation director Adam Mason who worked with the band on the “Genocidal Humanoidz” video, and Lt. Colonel Sargis Stepanyan of Armenian Wounded Heroes Fund. 

Also joining will be Harvard clinician Dr. Lilit Garibyan, whose Face of Angel charity has created medical laser treatments in Armenia and wants to provide medical scar laser treatments for soldiers trying to heal from burn and trauma scars. 

The video is slated to debut around 2 p.m. EST/11 a.m. PT to close out the show. 

Fans will be encouraged and able to make donations through the whole show. So far, System Of A Down has raised more than $600,000 through streams and sales, including from Bandcamp, to the Armenia Fund. 

Amber Healy

I write about music policy and lawsuits because they're endlessly fascinating.

Let us know what you think!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.