Wait: 25% of Canadians still don’t have ANY kind of mobile phone?

Everyone has a mobile phone now, right? Nope. Look at this chart from Statista.

Okay, I get it why 35% of India and 29% of Indonesia don’t have any sort of mobile phone. But look which country comes next: Canada.

According to this graph, a full 25% of Canadian adults still aren’t part of the cell phone collective. Meanwhile, another 9% are happy with a dumb feature phone (I’m looking at you, Dad.)

Canada is way, way behind the UK where only 5% or mobile-phone free and the US (6%). Even Russia is doing better.

Why? Is it because the cost of ownership of any cell phone is too high? Is it because so many of us still insist on having land lines? Any other theories?

These stats have other implications. For example, it could explain the slower-than-other-countries adoption of streaming music.

Or (see the comment below), the this data could be completely wrong.

Alan Cross

is an internationally known broadcaster, interviewer, writer, consultant, blogger and speaker. In his 40+ years in the music business, Alan has interviewed the biggest names in rock, from David Bowie and U2 to Pearl Jam and the Foo Fighters. He’s also known as a musicologist and documentarian through programs like The Ongoing History of New Music.

9 thoughts on “Wait: 25% of Canadians still don’t have ANY kind of mobile phone?

  • February 8, 2019 at 10:49 am
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    I’m not shocked at all. Way to expensive to own a smart phone with Bell and Rogers having a monoply.

    Reply
  • February 8, 2019 at 11:23 am
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    Our data rates are insane compared to other countries. For a lot of elderly people, it just isn’t worth the switch. Plus, have youever tried to explain how a modern smart phone or tablet works to a tablet? Holy moly…

    Reply
  • February 8, 2019 at 5:19 pm
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    It is certainly way too expensive. I actually have one only because I need it for medical emergencies. . I don’t want to be connected to people or work 24/7. My own time is just that- my own. The last time we had a power outage our cells ran out of power but out landline kept on working.

    Reply
  • February 9, 2019 at 5:04 am
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    In USA and I do not use a smartphone. Does anyone figure the part about the slave labor that goes into making those ‘smartphones’? Am I one of the ultra-sensitive to elecro-magnetic frequencies? Doesn’t anyone know that there is cancer, aging, drying out of soft tissues and loss of memory associated with cell phones? I am happy to have a landline. Cell phone towers, and wifi hot-spots make me nauseous. Oh yeah, only a few people recognize the bad health effects including harm to reproductive organs, eyes and lower immune systems from being near the signals. Right they’re everywhere. Watch out for 5g, we’ll all be fried. Look up ‘effects of cell phone towers’. Maybe that’ll give you a hint.

    Reply
  • February 1, 2021 at 9:30 pm
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    I have no need for a mobile or cell phone of any kind. As a matter of fact, I don’t even drive. I live in a big city with public transportation 24/7.

    Reply
  • August 12, 2021 at 11:19 am
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    My sister is happily mobile-free. I only ‘carry’ to keep in touch with time sensitive jobs. She used one while elder care issues were in the forefront. Now that era of her life is done (and well done I should say) she figures she has earned the right to retire properly away from constant contact. Leave a message on what she calls her ‘steam-driven’ ansaphone land line and she’ll get back to you when she feels like it. It all works for us without the spectacular cost of a mobile in Canada.

    Reply
  • June 6, 2022 at 4:22 pm
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    Personally, I like my ‘Me’ time and don’t want to be hassled while I’m getting my hair done or shopping for groceries or sitting at a CFL game. Hubby and I don’t have kids to keep an eye on or pickup from daycare or soccer practice or check in with the babysitter on. As far as I’m concerned, the whole world can just leave me alone while I’m enjoying the weekend or visiting with friends and family. We still have a landline, so call me at home and leave a message. I’m 57 years old now, and at this point, I can’t see myself ever owning a cellphone—ever.

    Reply

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